Baby Einsteins?


A recent post on the K5 Learning Blog reported data from a Fordham Institute study that demonstrated, with a database of over 80,000 students, that future success in academic subjects can be predicted by third grade success levels. High achievers in third grade continued to be high achievers throughout high school. Low achievers in third grade…continued to be low achievers.

Many parents may feel that having a tutor for their young child is unnecessary. After all, first grade is just about coloring inside the lines, right? Actually, primary and elementary school help to set students up with the basic skills they’ll need to succeed throughout life. Reading, writing, and basic mathematical abilities are the foundations of any academic subject, from home economics to chemistry to literature to global history. Without mastering these fundamental skills, how can a child succeed at higher levels?

This one may be a bit of a stretch. (Image Credit:https://lawafterthebar.wordpress.com/tag/baby-einstein/)

There are plenty of things parents can do. Read to your child more often. Let your child read to you. Take your child to the library. Have your child help you with counting money. Play educational board games such as Hi-Ho-Cherry-O! Tutoring only enhances what you can do with your child. Tutors who work with younger children do so because they truly love working with kids. They establish a rapport with your child, somewhere between mentor and friend, and they have lots of tools they can use to make learning more engaging and fun for your child. Whether it’s only to help with homework or to help build skills in a specific area, tutors can help you and your child achieve your educational goals.

So don’t ignore the warning signs, especially if your child is young. If you catch academic struggles early, it may be possible to set your child on a better educational track. Tutor Doctor WNY would love to be there to help, so please feel free to contact us for a free educational consultation!

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